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yeah write weekly writing challenge #214: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

yeah write weekly writing challenge #214: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

So how’d your writing – I mean, reading –  homework go yesterday? That good, huh? It’s hard to be a critical reader, but it’s definitely a skill worth working on!

Well, I’ve got some good news: we’re headed for summer vacation. That means relaxed, unmoderated grids are coming up. All you need to do is make word count and figure your badge out. Of course, since I have to read everything anyway, I’d be happier if you kept bringing your best stuff!

In the meantime, let’s give you the results on all three of our moderated grids – nonfiction, fiction|poetry, and microfiction – right here!

But it’s not all about the popular vote, folks. We also have our editorial staff picks to hand out. Every week our editors comb through your submissions looking for their favorites. Picks are based on writing quality, how successful the author is in conveying information, and just plain style. If you got a staff pick this week, grab your badge from the sidebar and wear it with pride!

Once you’re done reading through the staff picks (and congratulating the winners in the comments), keep scrolling down to check out who won the popular vote on all three grids.

Yeah write #214 weekly writing challenge staff picks: microstories

This week there were so many great microstories that it was practically impossible for me to choose just one. The grid was an utter pleasure to read. Frankly, if I could give each of you an editor’s pick, I would. Congratulations, everyone – you all deserve a gold star.

My pick this week goes to Michael at Hypothetically Writing. His microstory is a brilliant example of writing a complete story that happens to be a part of a larger series, but also stands well on its own. It’s like reading an in-joke that is still funny without knowing the full context. I’d like to point out that Michael, in my own personal and non-authoritative opinion, is a writer who keeps getting better and better over time. I’ve always loved his wit and quirky characters, but he’s also putting in a lot of effort to craft well-rounded stories.

christine

microstories editor

[Ed’s note: one of the tricks Michael uses to push his limits is consistently checking in with our poetry slams, focus on fiction, and Nate’s shots of espresso in the coffeehouse. If you haven’t tried any of these things yet, why not give it a shot? -rbg]

What kind of crime does a scofflaw commit after buying a belly dancer a drink at the bingo? Without any physical description, Mike delivers a complete character, a humorous conflict, a setting, and dangles a question at the end to which we’d all like to know the answer.

nate

nate

Congratulations to this week’s winners! If you earned the highest number of votes in either challenge, you are this week’s crowd favorite. If you came in first, second or third, you get “top three” honors. Grab your badge from our sidebar!

Looking for your badge? The fiction|poetry, nonfiction and microstories challenges all have the same winner, staff pick, and top three badges. It doesn’t clutter up our sidebar, and they’ll still look pretty on yours!

Everybody: before you go, please take some time to leave your favorites a little love in the comments.

Weekend moonshine grid opens today at 6 p.m. eastern time

Long posts. Short posts. Out of date posts. Posts that just don’t… quite… fit… you know where they go? The moonshine grid! Come on down at 6:00 when Natalie throws the doors open. The only thing she’s not admitting is commercial posts. Because really don’t be a jerk.

Congratulations to the crowd favorites at yeah write #214

Voting has closed, and the thumbnails are now sorted in order of most votes to fewest. Ties in the number of votes are broken by editor votes.

Congratulations if you’re at or near the top! Writing well is hard work, and we’re honored you’ve chosen us this week to showcase your entry.

If you’re at or near the bottom, don’t be discouraged. You’re in the right community for learning and growing as a writer, and we are always available with resources for those who ask nicely.

If you were voted crowd favorite, selected as an editor’s pick, or landed in the top three, there’s a badge in the sidebar for you. Go grab it!

To our readers and voters: thank you! See you next week.

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yeah write weekly writing challenge #213: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

yeah write weekly writing challenge #213: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

Welcome to the 213th winners’ post here at yeah write. Before we talk about the good writing this week, can I interrupt for a minute (j/k you don’t have any options, I write the posts) to talk about bad writing?

Let’s take everyone’s current favorite example of terrible writing and mine it for a few quotes, shall we?

He’s said such loving things today … But how long will he want to do this….

Feel it baby.

His voice is warm and husky like dark melted chocolate fudge caramel… or something.

Oh the sweet agony… his hands clasp my hips.

What do these quotes all have in common? That’s right. They abuse commas and ellipses terribly, and not in that fun, kinky way. Sometimes there is a totally gratuitous… ellipsis and other times a comma that really should be present is missing which creates a monotone effect. Or, conversely, sometimes commas can, well, be, overused.

It’s tempting to write the way we talk- even more so in blog posts. While writing should have a natural “voice,” it doesn’t have to extend the metaphor to inserting a comma or ellipsis every time you would pause for breath or thought while speaking. Ellipses especially should be treated carefully, observed from a distance and gently lured into occasional captivity. With deliberate husbandry, your commas and ellipses will help create emphasis in your writing, rather than… slowing… everything… down until… someone… in a red… shirt… dies.

But now it’s time to discuss good writing. You want to know the results of yesterday’s vote, right? Me too. So, just like every Friday, I’m going to give you the results on all three of our grids – nonfiction, fiction|poetry, and microfiction – right here!

But it’s not all about the popular vote, folks. We also have our editorial staff picks to hand out. Every week our editors comb through your submissions looking for their favorites. Picks are based on writing quality, how successful the author is in conveying information, and just plain style. If you got a staff pick this week, grab your badge from the sidebar and wear it with pride!

Once you’re done reading through the staff picks (and congratulating the winners in the comments), keep scrolling down to check out who won the popular vote on all three grids.

Yeah write #213 weekly writing challenge staff picks: nonfiction

michelle

nonfiction editor

When I see open letters, lists, and other unconventional formats, my first inclination is to roll my eyes. These styles often come off as gimmicky or cutesy when a simple narrative would have yielded a better result. It’s hard to pull off a quality essay in this format, especailly for our nonfiction grid, where the essential elements of central conflict and the so what can get lost in the mix. Jan’s submission this week, written in a question and answer presentation, nails it. We really get a sense of her life as a single parent, a glimpse of how things were different from today, and a conclusion that wraps up the story with evidence of the narrator’s shift in perspective. It’s a lighthearted look at a sensitive subject and the style supports that. We always support a writer’s quest to stretch outside of the comfort zone but these attempts often end in love letters. Not so in this case. Well done, Jan.

Yeah write #213 weekly writing challenge staff picks: fiction|poetry

I enjoyed Michael’s spin on the classic damsel in distress tale. He left out the gallant knight altogether and gave the distressing dragon a code of ethics and a penchant for passive aggression. The wit felt like an honest result of the situation he’d created and stayed true to the character’s voices–which is hard to achieve, since sometimes humor in writing can poke through the veil between the character’s voice and the author’s. The scene is written in such a way that it seems natural for the dragon to be proud of his profession as a hit-dragon and, until the dragon opened his jaws to incinerate the heroine, I was rooting for him to complete the job he’s obviously very good at doing.

nate

nate

Congratulations to this week’s winners!

Editors’ picks, grab this badge and add it with pride:

 

If you earned the highest number of votes in either challenge, you are this week’s crowd favorite. Here’s the code to add your badge:

 

If you came in first, second or third, you get “top three” honors:

The fiction|poetry, nonfiction and microstories challenges all have the same winner, staff pick, and top three badges. It doesn’t clutter up our sidebar, and they’ll still look pretty on yours!

Everybody: before you go, please take some time to leave your favorites a little love in the comments.

Weekend moonshine grid opens today at 6 p.m. eastern time

C’mere. Grab hold of the blog in front of you. OK, now the blog behind you hangs on. Tap your right shift key twice.  Tap your left shift key twice. Caps Lock. Tab. Space, space, space.

Then keep on doing the writer version of the bunny hop – albeit with more words and punctuation – on down to the moonshine grid, where Natalie will put on her ears and tail and unlock the doors at 6:00 EDT today! The only thing you can’t bring with you to this dance is commercial posts – they breed like… well… ellipses.

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yeah write weekly writing challenge #212: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

yeah write weekly writing challenge #212: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

Focus.

You know how sometimes you’re taking a picture with your phone, but the little focus box absolutely refuses to stay on the thing you’re actually trying to take a picture of? Yeah, uh, me neither. Never happens to me. Nope. But sometimes I feel like that when I’m writing. I’ll get through a whole description of something that was really important to me, and I’ll look back and not see one word about what made it important.

When that happens, I have to back up and regroup. See what details are in the picture that don’t need to be there, and what I should have included in the first place. Refocus. Even if it means discarding whole chunks of my original post.

Boy, does that hurt. I have a little folder that is the graveyard where those posts go to die because I’m not ready to let go and delete them yet. Some days I wander through there and pore over their literary corpses, hoping to find a granule of something as good as I thought they were when I wrote them. It almost never happens.

The thing those posts are missing is that elusive “so what” that takes them from just words on the page to a post on the grid. If you’re looking at a post and you’re not quite sure about it, ask yourself… so what? Why is it important to me to communicate this to someone else, and what do I want them to take away from it? That “so what” can be anything from a belly laugh to a new way of looking at the relationship between parents and children, but it needs to be there.

As you read back through the winning posts this week, look for that “so what” in them. You do read back through the winners each week and think about the writing style and techniques, right? Better reading makes for better writing. If you’re not quite sure what you’re looking for, stop by the coffeehouse for Nate’s shots of espresso, where he discusses techniques in a post from the prior week and gives you ideas for applying them in your own work.

Since you need to know who the winners are to read those posts, I’m going to give you the results on all three of our grids – nonfiction, fiction|poetry, and microfiction – right here and now!

But it’s not all about the popular vote, folks. We also have our editorial staff picks to hand out. Every week our editors comb through your submissions looking for their favorites. Picks are based on writing quality, how successful the author is in conveying information, and just plain style. If you got a staff pick this week, grab your badge from the sidebar and wear it with pride!

Once you’re done reading through the staff picks (and congratulating the winners in the comments), keep scrolling down to check out who won the popular vote on all three grids.

Yeah write #212 weekly writing challenge staff picks: nonfiction

michelle

nonfiction editor

[quote]When writing personal essays, it’s important to do more than just tell a story. Your reader needs to know why she’s reading it, but you also have to be careful not to come right out and say, “This is why you’re reading this.” This post does an excellent job of telling us a great deal of information – the time before the arrival of the children, their early days, and then the eventual shift in perspective over what one assumes is a long period of time. The final paragraph offers a summary of an epiphany, a conclusion complete with an introspective look at what had changed. That ending tells us why we should care, and care we certainly do.[/quote]

Yeah write #212 weekly writing challenge staff picks: fiction|poetry

[quote]Poems about seasons have been done forever. However, when you can use a season as a formal tool to illustrate a larger point about life, then you’ve created something exceptional, just as Seraphina has done. Love and springtime naturally go hand in hand, and this poem takes that union and creates a breezily paced narrative of shedding winter’s shackles, and how a relationship can mirror the weather. In this case, alliteration helps lend a musical hand to the lightly tripping beats, enticing us to sing along to love’s (and May’s) playful song.[/quote]

natalie

natalie

Yeah write #212 weekly writing challenge staff picks: microstories

christine

microstories editor

[quote]Angie’s poem starts out as a simple list of lost items and grows into something unexpectedly large. She effortlessly equates all the things in that list, making them all simultaneously bear the weight of meaning and then in a few words at the end blows that meaning away into old dust; either they all bear weight or none of them does. I get the impression that she’s leading us to believe they all have meaning – it’s nostalgic and quietly hopeful at the same time.[/quote]

Congratulations to this week’s winners! If you earned the highest number of votes in either challenge, you are this week’s crowd favorite. If you came in first, second or third, you get “top three” honors. Grab your badge from our sidebar!

Looking for your badge? The fiction|poetry, nonfiction and microstories challenges all have the same winner, staff pick, and top three badges. It doesn’t clutter up our sidebar, and they’ll still look pretty on yours!

Everybody: before you go, please take some time to leave your favorites a little love in the comments.

Weekend moonshine grid opens today at 6 p.m. eastern time

A good homemade liqueur takes 2 cups of vodka, 1 cup of fruits or flowers, and about 1/2 cup of simple syrup. A good post takes an idea, words, and the will to communicate. Why not take both and mix them up this weekend on Natalie’s moonshine grid? Just don’t add commercial posts to the mix; they’re bitter.

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yeah write weekly writing challenge #211: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

yeah write weekly writing challenge #211: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

They never let me write the kickoff posts. NEVER. Probably because I can’t be trusted. But anyway. You know what I get to kick off? THE ENTIRE MONTH OF MAY. TAKE THAT!

Uh. It’s possible I drank a whole lot of energy drink today. I can see through time. You know how I know? Because even though it’s still April while I’m writing this, I can see the May fiction and poetry jam posts!

Honestly, I’m excited to see what you guys come up with this month. Last month was a little rough, right? This month we’re taking a nice easy spin on things with a refresher on scansion in poetry and a fiction genre that won’t require a trip to the library.

For right now, let’s see how you did in the last week of April. Even though it’s not April any more, I’m going to give you the results on all three of our grids – nonfiction, fiction|poetry, and microfiction – right here!

But it’s not all about the popular vote, folks. We also have our editorial staff picks to hand out. Every week our editors comb through your submissions looking for their favorites. Picks are based on writing quality, how successful the author is in conveying information, and just plain style. If you got a staff pick this week, grab your badge from the sidebar and wear it with pride!

Once you’re done reading through the staff picks (and congratulating the winners in the comments), keep scrolling down to check out who won the popular vote on all three grids.

Yeah write #211 weekly writing challenge staff picks: nonfiction

michelle

nonfiction editor

[quote]Sam’s essay this week offers us both sadness and hope in a way that seems effortless. She lays her sorrow out for us and trusts us to feel it with her. Then, she flips things on us, offering us the glimpse of hope she feels as she works through the pain of loss during the excitement of new beginnings. The feelings are clear without ever being named outright. We feel her opening her heart to let the good feelings back in and it’s a pleasure to share in that with her.[/quote]

[quote]It takes a lot of effort to write about feelings without ever using the words for them. As much as to write about a whole person without doing more than describing the empty space they should occupy in your life. Grief is brutal and personal, and yet with gentle, impersonal words this post drives its knife deeper into your heart than any essay full of platitudes could do. Bravo.[/quote]

rowan

rowan

Yeah write #211 weekly writing challenge staff picks: fiction|poetry

natalie

natalie

[quote]I could start with the musicality of such phrases like “wizard-words swarmed like bees” and “spinning strong rope from paper and heart strings.” I could also start with the dazzling imagery of a “lightning-split oak” or a “mere bucketful of words.” Yet nothing does justice to the way she paints a portrait of longing and place, both connected through the deft composition.[/quote]

Yeah write #211 weekly writing challenge staff picks: microstories

[quote]I admit it: I’m a sucker for a tale of lost loves and aching hearts. It’s a familiar kind of story that can be told in so many different ways. In this case Brittany uses the tiniest of details to set the scene, to create a sense of space and dragging time, and eventually leads us to the real reason she’s not sleeping. The result is a story that’s both personal and universal.[/quote]

christine

microstories editor

Congratulations to this week’s winners! If you earned the highest number of votes in either challenge, you are this week’s crowd favorite. If you came in first, second or third, you get “top three” honors. Grab your badge from our sidebar!

Looking for your badge? The fiction|poetry, nonfiction and microstories challenges all have the same winner, staff pick, and top three badges. It doesn’t clutter up our sidebar, and they’ll still look pretty on yours!

Everybody: before you go, please take some time to leave your favorites a little love in the comments.

Weekend moonshine grid opens today at 6 p.m. eastern time

If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands. If you’re happy hour and you know it, be 6:00 EDT when the moonshine grid opens. Natalie keeps the lights on all weekend, so stop by with all your weird posts that don’t fit on our regular grids. The ones with the top hats. The listicles. Just not the promotional ones, okay? They make us sad.

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yeah write weekly writing challenge #210: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

yeah write weekly writing challenge #210: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

Hey, y’all. Time for another edition of Rowan Talks Srs Writer Stuff(tm). Suffer through it, and I’ll get you to the vote results.

I haven’t been ready, for a variety of reasons, to talk about the mess that is this year’s Hugo Awards. But it’s worth talking about. It’s worth discussing. And it’s something that you as a writer should be aware of.

The Hugos, of course, have so many voters that they don’t have the luxury of monitoring closely for cheating, targeted votes, self-votes and campaigning in the way that a smaller community like ours is able to. But the basic issue is still the same: are we casting votes for the story, or because we like or dislike the author? Are you really reading carefully and selecting the work on the grid that you think is the overall best, regardless of whether the theme is personally appealing to you? Or are you selecting a story whose moral or author you like, and overlooking sentence structure or the strength of the essay because you want that person or idea to do well?

We hope that you’re voting for the best work, reading critically and giving thought to each piece before casting your vote. As editors, we are careful to make sure that our personal preferences for story theme or style don’t override a vote for a higher-quality work that we personally disagree with. Of course, that doesn’t mean that good work isn’t work that you agree with, or that an essay that resonates deeply with you isn’t the best one on the grid. But it’s something to keep in mind. When a popular vote becomes a popularity vote, your award becomes less meaningful. You’ll never know if you received the crowd favorite because you’re a good writer, or because someone put you on a list somewhere – as happened to several of the Hugo nominees.

We want you to be proud of your successes, and to help you improve as writers. Making sure that you vote for the best posts on each grid helps keep our community strong and gives you more to be proud of when you win.

Whew.

Thanks for sticking with me. Just like I promised, it’s time to give you the results on all three of our grids – nonfiction, fiction|poetry, and microfiction – right here! Beyond the popular vote, we also have editorial staff picks to hand out. Every week our editors comb through your submissions looking for their favorites. Picks are based on writing quality, how successful the author is in conveying information, and just plain style. If you got a staff pick this week, grab your badge from the sidebar and wear it with pride!

Once you’re done reading through the staff picks (and congratulating the winners in the comments), keep scrolling down to check out who won the popular vote on all three grids.

Yeah write #210 weekly writing challenge staff picks: fiction|poetry

nate

nate

[quote]So often authors feel they need over-the-top plot lines and quirky characters to capture their readers’ attentions. Meg’s entry proves that all the hubbub isn’t necessary. Most life-changing revelations, in fact, happen quietly. In her daily routine, Colleen realizes how fragile life is: how drowning is just a matter of chemistry, how the act of swimming is all one needs to appreciate living. And then, tangled into those ideas are gorgeous and colliding images of cellos and tadpoles, choirs and tortoises, lake water and rocket fuel. I gasped along with Colleen at the end of that last sentence and then I had to dive right back in to the swirling world Meg created. [/quote]

Yeah write #210 weekly writing challenge staff note: microstories

christine

microstories editor

[quote]Have you noticed that often it’s the same people who place at the top of the pack in the popular vote? We certainly have. And we love those people, but we love the rest of you, too. If you’re consistently ending up below the top three, take a moment to think about that. Why are you here? Are you here to write and get comments? Maybe you’re happy in the middle of the pack week after week. That’s awesome. But maybe you’re hungry to improve, to move up the grid, to come home with that top three, crowd fave or editor’s pick badge. If that sounds like you, take a look at the winners, and especially at the people who win consistently, and see what they’re doing that you’re not. Maybe you don’t write exactly like them; that’s okay! You should have your own voice. But they’re definitely using techniques and devices that you can incorporate into your own work. So the next time you read a really great microstory, don’t just think “darn, that’s better than mine.” Think “what’s she doing that’s different, and what would happen if I tried it?”[/quote]

Congratulations to this week’s winners! If you earned the highest number of votes in either challenge, you are this week’s crowd favorite. If you came in first, second or third, you get “top three” honors. Grab your badge from our sidebar!

Looking for your badge? The fiction|poetry, nonfiction and microstories challenges all have the same winner, staff pick, and top three badges. It doesn’t clutter up our sidebar, and they’ll still look pretty on yours!

Everybody: before you go, please take some time to leave your favorites a little love in the comments.

Weekend moonshine grid opens today at 6 p.m. eastern time

Not sure if you’re fiction or nonfiction? We don’t care. Round about 6:00 tonight, Natalie will open the doors to the coolest bar with the hottest performers on the web. Bring your tiny car, your big dog, your imaginary friend and your posts from 1988. Just leave the commercial posts and paint thinner home. They make the bouncer nervous for some reason.

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yeah write weekly writing challenge #209: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

yeah write weekly writing challenge #209: popular vote winners and editors’ picks

No matter what hemisphere you’re in, you’re trapped midway between summer and winter. These days have some of my favorite weather: warm enough to run around in comfortable t-shirts but cold enough to sleep under blankets at night still. On the other hand, as I was reminded today, picnic weather is coming. It’ll be time to pack blankets, food, drinks, and maybe even a computer or notebook to get some writing done under the trees instead of the ceiling. I’ve gone down the dark hole of recipes for tiny sandwiches on Pinterest and come out covered in twine and inspiration. What’s your favorite summer food?

Speaking of recipes, though, how about a recipe for success? You know that moment when you’re looking through the vote results (not yet! scroll back up! wait!) and you realize that while you’re not really getting love letters anymore, you’re not hitting the top of the grids regularly either? Yeah, there’s a big blank spot in the middle there and it can be really frustrating.

One way to get out of that hole is to find a writing friend. Someone who gives you honest – not flattering – feedback on your work and how you can take the next step. Another way is to pay attention to the comments. Jennifer K, for example, is terrific at making the rounds and pointing out what you’re doing well. If you haven’t heard from her yet, try writing for one of the grids she’s usually on. It’ll do you good to stretch your creative legs, and the feedback high is the best!

Yet another way (shameless plug coming here) is to become a member here at yeah write. For way, way less than I spend on coffee and bourbon, you get a whole lot back in terms of social media shoutouts… and you also get editorial consultations. That means you can have an editor take a look at your post before you submit it and tell you what we think still needs to be cleaned up. Or you can spend your consultations on post-vote analyses. While we never know for sure why a particular post did well or poorly, we’ve been doing this every week for four years now and we’ve got a pretty good feel for the general reasons you might not be getting votes and what you might need to improve.

Speaking of votes, though. Boy, was this a tough week! I love it when the grids look this good, but it makes voting really hard. So with that in mind, I’m going to give you the results on all three of our grids – nonfiction, fiction|poetry, and microfiction – right here!

But it’s not all about the popular vote, folks. We also have our editorial staff picks to hand out. Every week our editors comb through your submissions looking for their favorites. Picks are based on writing quality, how successful the author is in conveying information, and just plain style. If you got a staff pick this week, grab your badge from the sidebar and wear it with pride!

Once you’re done reading through the staff picks (and congratulating the winners in the comments), keep scrolling down to check out who won the popular vote on all three grids.

Yeah write #209 weekly writing challenge staff picks: nonfiction

michelle

nonfiction editor

[quote]Finding uniqueness in something ordinary is tough work, especially when the ordinary thing is common to almost all humans. Cyn takes us into her world through how she eats McDonald’s french fries and, specifically, how she and her coworker eat them differently. The key here is that it’s interesting. The reader cares about why Cyn eats her fries like she does and why she compares herself to this other person. The level of detail on something so many of us do coupled with the intense self-scrutiny Cyn provides makes for an excellent essay. [/quote]

[quote]There’s a moment in reading personal essays when everything goes quiet. I have to read in absolute stillness, as though I’m afraid I’ll scare the essay away by breathing too hard. Nancy’s piece this week is one of those. With a careful, delicate touch she builds layers of meaning like assembling baklava, each paper-thin sheet of phyllo brushed with butter, sprinkled with nuts and cinnamon, and then hidden by the next sheet until, covered in honey, the baklava is sliced open to reveal its strata. This essay, at its heart, is about freeing yourself from fear, embracing the things you love, being kind to yourself when you don’t succeed, and letting go of the things you only think you should be doing in favor of finding your happiness in what you are meant to do. But instead of saying all that and sounding preachy, Nancy shows, not tells, by teaching you how to find those lessons in something that is precious to her. Instead of insisting that the reader live their whole life according to dictated principles, she coaxes you into a world where you might learn about yourself while you think you’re learning how to cook.[/quote]

rowan

rowan

stacie

stacie

[quote]As a scientist, I know that everything huge is made up of infinitesimal particles. As a writer, I struggle to find a way to make connections between the big ideas and the small things that symbolize them in everyday life. But that’s exactly what AnaChips did this week. It’s not a story about a table, exactly. It’s a story about the stories the table is part of. A yearning toward place, anchored at either end by the table firmly set in its eventual home. Where the table is now a dumping ground, it – like AnaChips herself – was once a dumped object. By taking this tiny reflection – the stuff on the table; the table in the places – and growing it incrementally, AnaChips has anchored not only the piece but the reader in both the huge and the infinitesimal. [/quote]

Yeah write #209 weekly writing challenge staff picks: fiction|poetry

[quote]No literary device gets my inner poetry fiend more excited than alliteration, and Tienne’s dróttkvætt trips along musically, as well as rhythmically. The skillful use of language not only paints a picture of the crisp Brittonic surroundings, but also gives it a more complete sensory feel of the whitecaps and the pines––after reading it, I almost wanted to wrap myself in a chunky sweater against the winds along the heath. I know she worked this piece with a writing buddy, and it definitely paid off. It just goes to show that when working with a challenging form, another set of eyes can be invaluable.[/quote]

natalie

natalie

Yeah write #209 weekly writing challenge staff picks: microstories

christine

microstories editor

[quote]With delicate, loving detail, Anusha sets up a scene full of warm, homey comfort – and then turns it on its head with five words: “How do I tell her?” There’s a longing in the last line that caught me completely unawares. It’s a nostalgia we’re all familiar with, coupled with an unwillingness to admit it lest we hurt someone. A simple story, beautifully crafted.[/quote]

Congratulations to this week’s winners! If you earned the highest number of votes in either challenge, you are this week’s crowd favorite. If you came in first, second or third, you get “top three” honors. Grab your badge from our sidebar!

Looking for your badge? The fiction|poetry, nonfiction and microstories challenges all have the same winner, staff pick, and top three badges. It doesn’t clutter up our sidebar, and they’ll still look pretty on yours!

Everybody: before you go, please take some time to leave your favorites a little love in the comments.

Weekend moonshine grid opens today at 6 p.m. eastern time

Pack your picnic basket, BYOB, and head on down to the moonshine grid today at 6pm EDT. Natalie’s spreading out the blankets on the banks of the River Baranduin, and everyone’s welcome to come to our long-expected party… except commercial posts. Those guys and their creepy horses and tattered hoods can just stay away.

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